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Rafting Equipment Stores Boise ID

Local guide for your rafting equipment retailers in Boise. Includes detailed information on local businesses that provide outdoors stores, rafting equipment, raft paddles, oars, life jackets, rafts, kayaking gear, outdoor supplies, dry boxes, dry bags, inflatable rafts, raft frames, raft pump and camping supplies, as well as advice on whitewater rafting and whitewater rafting trips.

Sports Authority
(208) 344-2037
East Gate Plaza, 670 E. Boise Avenue
Boise, ID
Services
Golf Trade-In Program, Ski-Snowboard Rentals, Ski-Snowboard/Bike Tech Shop, Firearms/Hunting, Hunting and Fishing Licenses, Delivery & Assembly
Hours
Monday - Saturday: 9:00am - 9:30pm
Sunday: 10:00am - 8:00pm
Holiday hours may vary.

Boise REI Store
(208) 322-1141
8300 W Emerald St
Boise, ID
 
Cascade Outfitters
(800) 223-Raft
P. O. Box 404
Boise, ID
 
Dick's Sporting Goods
(208) 238-6002
Pocatello Square
Pocatello, ID
 
Sports Authority
(208) 344-2037
East Gate Plaza, 670 E. Boise Avenue
Boise, ID
Services
Golf Trade-In Program, Ski-Snowboard Rentals, Ski-Snowboard/Bike Tech Shop, Firearms/Hunting, Hunting and Fishing Licenses, Delivery & Assembly
Hours
Monday - Saturday: 9:00am - 9:30pm
Sunday: 10:00am - 8:00pm
Holiday hours may vary.

Idaho River Sports
(208) 336-4844
3100 Pleasanton Ave or
Boise, ID
 
Sports Authority
(208) 378-9590
1301 N. Milwaukee Street
Boise, ID
Services
Golf Day Shop, Golf Trade-In Program, Ski-Snowboard Rentals & Jr. Season Lease, Ski-Snowboard/Bike Tech Shop, Firearms/Hunting, Hunting and Fishing Licenses, Delivery & Assembly
Hours
Monday - Saturday: 9:00am - 9:30pm
Sunday: 10:00am - 8:00pm
Holiday hours may vary.

Sports Authority
(208) 442-7309
Nampa Gateway Center, 1460 N. Happy Valley Road
Nampa, ID
Services
Golf Day Shop, Golf Trade-In Program, Ski-Snowboard Jr. Season Lease, Ski-Snowboard/Bike Tech Shop, Firearms/Hunting, Hunting and Fishing Licenses, Delivery & Assembly
Hours
Monday - Saturday: 9:00am - 9:30pm
Sunday: 10:00am - 8:00pm
Holiday hours may vary.

Northwest River Supplies
(800) 635-5202
2009 S. Main
Moscow, ID
 
Riverat Whitewater Toyz
(208) 735-8697
138 2nd Ave S.
Twin Falls, ID
 

Packraft Rating (PR) System

Roman Dial demystifies whitewater for the packrafter wanting to understand the natural progression of learning to packraft in the context of increasingly difficult whitewater.

by Roman Dial | 2008-06-24 00:15:00-06

Editors Note: This article has been excerpted from the book Packrafting! An Introduction and How-To Guide , by Roman Dial (ISBN 978-0-9748188-3-2, Published by Backpacking Light, 2008).

Packraft Rating (PR) System

Standard whitewater ratings are not always a good indicator of packrafting difficulty. Some very technical rapids that are low volume and shallow - dangerous in a kayak - feel easier and safer in a packraft. Meanwhile, big, high volume but technically easy rapids can be tough in a packraft. Hence the following system, which should be considered open ended.

Packraft Rating (PR) System - 1
Good sport in a packraft. Running Ship Creek's Two by Four rapids (PR 5), near Anchorage, Alaska.

Ratings

PR 1 Flat water, little or no current, no obstacles. No special techniques or gear needed. Lakes and slow rivers.

PR 2 Gentle current, small waves. Ferrying technique necessary to maneuver and avoid sweepers, strainers, and shallows. Floating is relaxed. Rain gear and garbage bags sufficient to keep dry.

PR 3 One to two foot tall wave trains, eddy lines, and holes can swamp and/or flip boat. Ferrying and back-paddling necessary to avoid obstacles, miss holes and rocks. Drysuit or wetsuit is insurance against swims and waves. Dry-bag protects gear. Requires novice boating-with-a-backpack skills. Bicycles or passengers manageable in boat.

PR 4 River powerful, often Class III for canoes, kayaks, and paddle rafts, meaning water reading necessary and scouting recommended. Flip potential high with loaded boats. Swamping avoidable with good technique or spray cover. Throw ropes and swift-water rescue training advised, although self-rescue easy.

PR 5 Generally Class IV or high volume Class III for canoes, kayaks, and paddle rafts. Scouting of rapids necessary. Spray skirts or decks, drysuits, helmets, and unloaded boats strongly recommended as well as safety personnel. Bracing, forward paddling, and confidence while big waves crash overhead needed. Precise maneuvering necessary through intense and powerful water. Swimming is risky. Throw ropes and swift-water rescue training strongly advised.

Learning to Packraft: A Suggested Sequence of Waters

Below is a suggested progression from first-time in a boat to longer trips. The progression was developed successfully through month-long classes in packrafting I have taught at Alaska Pacific University from 1997-2007. It is meant to be a step-by-step guide - using skills described in the following chapters - to quickly get beginners to the stage that took many of us years to reach.

Step 1: Stillwater Basics

Pool or lake boating to learn paddling strokes, both side to side and backwards, and t...

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Two in One Boat: Sharing a Packraft on a River Trip

With 40 lbs from skin out for both father and son, would our contingency plan of "snuggling for warmth" come into play?

by Ryan Jordan | 2009-08-04 00:10:00-06

Preface

As the rear of the boat was sucked back into the eddy fence, I felt water rushing down my back. "Paddle! Hard! Now!" I yelled to my little companion in the front of the boat. In tandem, we gave it all we had and managed to eke back into the current, leaving the foot-high eddy boils behind us.

Such is life in a packraft, which is more sensitive to load:boat weight ratios than other boats, making the consideration of weight even more critical when there are two people sharing a single six-pound packraft.

Two in One Boat: Sharing a Packraft on a River Trip (Gear List) - 1
Fully decked out - two people in one boat, with a fully skinned out gear and supply of weight of 40 pounds, including the boat.

Introduction

We graduated from Webelos in April (me as Den Leader, Chase with his Arrow of Light) and immediately crossed over into our new Boy Scout troop, particularly enthused about our first outing: canoeing the Jefferson River in June. Because this was a family trek, we weren't confined to the constraints (and some of the freedoms) of camping and cooking using the Patrol Method (the BSA philosophy by which groups of boys camp and cook as a single unit of 4-8 people). Instead, we'd camp and cook together as father and son.

When we saw the trek on the calendar, we looked at each other and smirked: the obvious message that neither of us needed to communicate was that this would be a great opportunity to try out the new Alpacka Double Duck, a two-person packraft designed for calm water.

Along with the packraft - which, once occupied by two inhabitants, doesn't have much room remaining - we'd share a bunch of other stuff too: first aid kit, cook kit, shelter, firestarting supplies, and go pretty thin on the rest. We would eliminate a shelter floor, sleeping pads, and gas stove; we'd both bring hoodless down mummy bags that weighed 17-19 ounces each (snuggling for warmth if we needed to), leave home that extra "insurance layer" (snuggling for warmth if we needed to), employ multiple use items as much as possible, and eliminate some food weight (snuggling for warmth if we needed to).

We didn't actually have to employ our contingency strategy (snuggling) and fared rather comfortably on the trip, traveling down the river fully skinned out with about 40 pounds of gear and food for the two of us. That 40 pounds included all of our gear, supplies, clothing worn, boating gear, and of course, boats.

Two in One Boat: Sharing a Packraft on a River Trip (Gear List) - 2
The big platform of the Double Duck makes it a very stable boat, allowing Chase to paddle on his knees, one of the more comfortable positions he found.

Boating Gear

It's no surprise that I'm a fan of Alpacka rafts (www.alpackaraft.com). I've enjoyed "two-in-one boat" trips before, in what was formerly known as the Alpacka Dory...

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Wilderness Cred for the Packrafting Noobs

I was perfectly content to let others do all the lightweight lifting, but at the first chance of a packrafting class (learning to play without buying the gear!), I jumped... and pulled my husband, Rob, with me.

by Addie Bedford, video by Rob Bedford | 2009-09-15 00:05:00-06

The paths that led me to eventually (and finally) plunking my backside into a packraft were circuitous at best.

Path 1

I grew up rafting. My family co-owned a ten-man raft with a few other families - we all chipped in because no one could afford one outright - but it "lived" at our house. We'd fill the cooler with drinks, grab a bucket of KFC, and hit the Yellowstone River by noon on a hot summer Saturday. Floating down the dun-colored river, slipping in to cool off when the tubes got too hot, pulling off at little islands that caught our fancy, jumping out to pretend that the three of us girls could help our parents drag the raft over shallow rock beds... it was heaven. We returned home happily tired and sunburnt, content in our day on the water.

As a result, I've always been comfortable on moving water, but large bodies of water freak me out. There are monsters in lakes, ponds, and oceans, so I tend to approach them with ambivalence and caution - much the way I approach my crawlspace and for the same reason. Rivers, however, have always been a source of delight to me, from swimming in them to camping near them to being surrounded by them in Bozeman.

Path 2

Though I was the customer support director for Backpacking Light Magazine for two years, my grasp of the written word and the proper use of mechanics, grammar, and spelling meant that I was regularly called upon to proofread articles before they were published, both online and in the print magazine. When Ryan Jordan worked with Roman Dial on a book dedicated to packrafting and educating the continental U.S. on the sport (packrafting is pretty established in Alaska, the original home of Alpacka Raft), I was included, copy-editing and proofreading and reference-checking the manuscript so many times that I thought my eyes were going to bleed. It was awesome. I gained insight into the complete process of publishing a book and what a pain in the rear it can be.

Packrafting sounded intriguing, fun, and a little bit thrilling given the size of the craft, though I was reasonably sure I'd never do it. I couldn't afford a packraft, and probably wouldn't have used it often enough to justify the purchase anyway. Ever since my late husband, Blake Morstad (who wrote for BPL), died in an avalanche, I was so preoccupied with our son that the idea of backpacking, camping, or hiking again was pushed firmly towards the back of my mind. Single parenthood was far too pressing, and I really only enjoy such recreational pursuits when done with others. I am not a solitar...

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